The worm that turned: The WannaCry attack reveals the risks of a computerised world | The Economist

IT SOUNDS like a Hollywood disaster film. A group of hackers use a stolen cyber-weapon to try to extort money from people worldwide. The attack cripples hospitals, causing ambulances to be diverted and operations to be cancelled.

Then a lone security researcher stumbles across a way to halt the bug in its tracks. Yet that is exactly what happened last week when a piece of ransomware called WannaCry, which infects computers running outdated versions of Microsoft’s Windows operating system, hit not just Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) but Russia’s interior ministry, Chinese universities, Germany’s state railways and plenty more besides.

It could have been much worse. WannaCry does not seem to have been a deliberate attack on hospitals, but a criminal money-making scheme in which the NHS was collateral damage.

Read more: The worm that turned: The WannaCry attack reveals the risks of a computerised world | The Economist

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The worm that turned: The WannaCry attack reveals the risks of a compu…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in News, Online
Sexy wearables
Miroslava Duma’s new industrial revolution

Miroslava Duma, a 32-year-old Russian entrepreneur with a low, earnest voice and an even lower elevation, is describing some of...

Close