Will our love affair with robots land us in the Natural History Museum?

Why do humans want to build robots? It seems, on the face of it, to be a suicidal endeavour, destroying jobs and, ultimately, rendering our species redundant as more intelligent and effective beings take over. Lacking, as we now do, an agreed metaphysical justification for human specialness, it must only be a matter of time before we submit to the machine ascendancy.

So far, it has been a subtle, incremental process that conceals any wider significance. Take satellite navigation. First introduced in the 1980s, it’s now more or less universal. Maps have become quaint. So we walk or drive without a visual model of where we are. This may be a small loss of human agency but it’s a loss nonetheless.

Driverless cars may turn out to be a less subtle, more spectacular example.

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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Will our love affair with robots land us in the Natural History Museum…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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