The Quest to Bring 3-D-Printed Homes to the Developing World

IN THE LOW-SLUNG hills of El Salvador, building a house is not an easy task. The land is vulnerable to earthquakes, flooding, volcanic eruptions. The roads are rugged, electricity sparse.

For the past several years, New Story—a housing charity based in San Francisco—has built over 150 homes there, replacing tarps and scrap metal shelters with houses that have proper roofs and floors. It’s slow, painstaking work in a country where nearly a third of the population is without shelter.

About a year ago, the company wondered if there was a better way to build. In the three years since it launched, New Story had gathered the funding to construct 1,300 homes and had completed 850 of them—but that felt like a drop in a bucket. There are over 100 million people living in slum conditions.

Read more: The Quest to Bring 3-D-Printed Homes to the Developing World

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The Quest to Bring 3-D-Printed Homes to the Developing World

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in 3D Printing, News
Artificial Sight
Artificial Photoreceptors Return Vision to Blind Mice

Blindness in many people is caused by diseased rod and cone cells that are responsible for turning light into electric...

Close