Microsoft HoloLens Exec Talks Augmented Reality Future | Fortune.com

In less than ten years, people will routinely interact with digital graphics and holograms beamed onto the real world.That’s according to Lorraine Bardeen, Microsoft’s general manager of Windows and HoloLens. Speaking at the annual AWE conference for augmented reality in Santa Clara, Bardeen discussed why Microsoft sees the nascent technology becoming the next way people use computers beyond mobile touchscreens or the standard keyboard and mouse

Microsoft reveals prototype augmented reality glasses

Microsoft has revealed a pair of prototype AR glasses, that looks a lot like an everyday pair of specs.

With the Redmond’s AR ambitions currently being powered by a bulky headset, the reveal of these smartglasses (image below) in a research paper indicates it has been exploring different ways to propel the HoloLens platform forward.

Scopis Introduces Mixed Reality to Simplify Surgical Navigation

Scopis has announced a mixed reality surgical navigation system that uses the Microsoft HoloLens for spinal surgery applications.

It combines current surgical navigation technologies with Microsoft’s augmented reality headset to show surgeons where they’re drilling into in real-time, without shifting their gaze away from the surgical field

Microsoft’s HoloLens: How these surgeons can now voyage around patients’ organs | ZDNet

Using Microsoft’s HoloLens platform, researchers in Oslo have developed a way of turning traditional two-dimensional medical images into 3D augmented-reality models for planning surgery and navigating around organs during operations.

Microsoft’s new reality – HoloLens comes to UK – BBC

This is a big week for virtual reality, with Sony’s PlayStation VR headset going on sale on Thursday. But Microsoft, which has steered clear of VR, is going down a different path with what it calls mixed reality – a term it prefers for some reason to augmented reality.

HoloLens: the virtual reality headset for elevator repair | The Guardian

Passengers in a ThyssenKrupp elevator in the tallest building in the western hemisphere might have felt their ears pop on the way to the 63rd floor last Thursday. There, using Minority Report-style mixed-reality glasses, the German engineering behemoth had joined Microsoft to demonstrate the bleeding edge of elevator repair technology.

Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]