An Improved AlphaGo Wins Its First Game Against the World’s Top Go Player

In the first game of his match with AlphaGo—the Go-playing machine built by Google’s DeepMind—Chinese grandmaster Ke Jie opened with a move straight from the playbook of his AI opponent. But the gambit didn’t work. After four hours and fifteen minutes of play, the 19-year-old grandmaster resigned, and AlphaGo grabbed a 1–0 lead in this best-of-three match.

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The mind in the machine: Demis Hassabis on artificial intelligence

Modern civilisation is a miraculous feat, one made possible by science. Every time I take a flight, I marvel at the technology that has allowed us to soar above the clouds as a matter of routine. We have mapped the genome, built supercomputers and the internet, landed probes on comets, smashed atoms at near light speed in particle accelerators and put a man on the Moon.

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What DeepMind brings to Alphabet | The Economist

DEEPMIND’S office is tucked away in a nondescript building next to London’s Kings Cross train station. From the outside, it doesn’t look like something that two of the world’s most powerful technology companies, Facebook and Google, would have fought to acquire. Google won, buying DeepMind for £400m ($660m) in January 2014. But why did it want to own a British artificial-intelligence (AI) company in the first place? Google was already on the cutting edge of machine learning and AI, its newly trendy cousin. What value could DeepMind provide?

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Google DeepMind gives computer ‘dreams’ to improve learning | Stuff.co.nz

Androids may not, as science fiction writer Philip Dick once posited, dream of electric sheep. But the newest artificial intelligence system from Google’s DeepMind division does indeed dream, metaphorically at least, about finding apples in a maze.

Researchers at DeepMind wrote in a paper that they had achieved a leap in the speed and performance of a machine learning system.

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