To Survive the Streets, Self-Driving Cars Have to Start Thinking Like Humans

NEXT TIME YOU’RE driving down the road or walking down the street, pause to consider how you read your surroundings. How you pay extra attention to the kid kicking a soccer ball around her front lawn and the slightly wobbly, nervous looking cyclist. How you de-prioritize the woman striding toward the street, knowing she’s heading for the group of friends waving to her from the sidewalk.

You make these calls by drawing on a lifetime of social and cultural experience so ingrained you hardly need to think about it. But imagine you’re an autonomous car trying to do the same thing, without that accumulated knowledge or the shared humanity that lets you read others’ nuanced behavioral cues. Treating every pedestrian, cyclist, and vehicle as an obstacle to be avoided will keep you from hitting anything.

Read more: To Survive the Streets, Self-Driving Cars Have to Start Thinking Like Humans

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

To Survive the Streets, Self-Driving Cars Have to Start Thinking Like …

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in News, Travel
Tesla's Second Floor
Inside Tesla’s Secret Second Floor | Backchannel

While working at Tesla, I always enjoyed talking to people after they finished a factory tour. As much as they raved...

Close