This solar-powered device can squeeze water out of thin air

You can’t squeeze blood from a stone, but you can squeeze water from thin air. The new water harvester is made of metal organic framework crystals pressed into a thin sheet of copper metal and placed between a solar absorber (above) and a condenser plate (below).

The device you see above can produce nearly 3 liters of water per day, and researchers say they can make it work even better. The key to their success is a family of crystalline powders called metal organic frameworks, or MOFs.

MOFs are compounds consisting of metal ions or clusters which form 2D or 3D structures. They are a special type of polymers, often porous. To the naked eye, they would look pretty much like sand.

Omar Yaghi, a chemist at Berkeley, first demonstrated MOFs 20 years ago.

Read more: This solar-powered device can squeeze water out of thin air — 3 liters a day

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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This solar-powered device can squeeze water out of thin air

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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