Silicon Isn’t Just for Computers. It Can Make a Pretty Good Kidney, Too

EVERY WEEK, TWO million people across the world sit for hours, hooked up to a whirring, blinking, blood-cleaning dialysis machine. Their alternatives: Find a kidney transplant or die.

In the US, dialysis is a roughly 40-billion-dollar business keeping 468,000 people with end-stage renal disease alive. The process is far from perfect, but that hasn’t hindered the industry’s growth. That’s thanks to a federally mandated Medicare entitlement that guarantees any American who needs dialysis—regardless of age or financial status—can get it, and get it paid for.

The legally enshrined coverage of dialysis has doubtlessly saved thousands of lives since its enactment 45 years ago, but the procedure’s history of special treatment has also stymied innovation. The US government spends about 50 times more on private dialysis companies than it does on kidney disease research to improve treatments.

Read more: Silicon Isn’t Just for Computers. It Can Make a Pretty Good Kidney, Too

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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Silicon Isn’t Just for Computers. It Can Make a Pretty Good Kidn…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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