Safety last: How to manage the computer-security threat | The Economist

COMPUTER security is a contradiction in terms. Consider the past year: cyberthieves stole $81m from the central bank of Bangladesh; the $4.8bn takeover of Yahoo by Verizon was nearly derailed by two enormous data breaches; and Russian hackers interfered in the American presidential election.

Away from the headlines, a black market in computerised extortion, hacking-for-hire and stolen digital goods is booming. The problem is about to get worse. Computers increasingly deal not just with abstract data like credit-card details and databases, but also with the real world of physical objects and vulnerable human bodies. A modern car is a computer on wheels; an aeroplane is a computer with wings.

The arrival of the “Internet of Things” will see computers baked into everything from road signs and MRI scanners to prosthetics and insulin pumps.

Read more: Safety last: How to manage the computer-security threat | The Economist

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Safety last: How to manage the computer-security threat | The Economis…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in News, Online
Sci-Fi Anti-Cancer Cap
This Sci-Fi Anti-Cancer Cap Is Producing Impressive Results

American Brain Tumor Association president and CEO, Elizabeth Wilson, commented, "We are excited that combination therapy with Optune plus temozolomide...

Close