Robots Won’t Try To Kill Us, Says Stanford’s 100-Year Study Of AI | Fast Company

For many people, talking about artificial intelligence and its implications for the future of humanity inspires the conversational equivalent of that internet argument about the dress being blue or gold. Some people will see abundant possibility; others, the period at the end of humanity’s story, as they conflate AI with killer robots and super-intelligent machines that will come to regard us as pets—or worse.

A Stanford University-hosted project is under way to look past all that—past the pop-culture takes on AI, the warnings from tech thinkers, and the breathless hype about assistive AI tools in our phones and other devices. The project was set up to take the long view of AI—a very, very long view.

Its formal name: One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence.

Read more: Robots Won’t Try To Kill Us, Says Stanford’s 100-Year Study Of AI | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Robots Won’t Try To Kill Us, Says Stanford’s 100-Year Stud…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in Machine Learning, Man v Robot, News
Machine translation
Google’s neural network learns to translate languages it hasn’t been trained on • The Register

The gap between human and machine translators could be narrowing as researchers find a new way to improve the learning...

Close