Robotics, AI​​ and 3D printing could close UK’s productivity gap | The Guardian

The future has already arrived in a small factory in Worcester, according to the man hired by Theresa May to put Britain at the forefront of the next industrial revolution.

Juergen Maier, the chief executive of Siemens UK, believes new technologies including robotics, artificial intelligence and additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, can deliver greater productivity and create more highly paid jobs.

But failing to crack the next revolution will come at a high price: falling living standards. The work being done in Worcester, and places like it, will be crucial if Britain is to be successful outside the EU, Maier says.

“The beauty of it is, if we get this right, it doesn’t just drive productivity, but it also means that you’re driving jobs up the value chain,” the 53-year-old says.

Read more: Robotics, AI​​ and 3D printing could close UK’s productivity gap | Business | The Guardian

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Robotics, AI​​ and 3D printing could close UK’s productivity…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in 3D Printing, News
Robot tax in San Francisco
San Francisco politician Jane Kim is exploring a tax on robots – Business Insider

The tech industry collectively face-palmed when Trump's treasury secretary said that the threat of robots taking human jobs was "not...

Close