This robot-run 3D printing farm is the future of light manufacturing | ZDNet

A 3D printing farm in Brooklyn needed to scale up to handle large production runs and better compete with injection molding.

Until recently, that would have required investing in more 3D printers and additional manpower to run the machines, eliminating many of the cost advantages inherent in 3D printing.

Voodoo Manufacturing invested in a single robot, which it leaves running all night–what’s known as “lights-out” manufacturing.

It’s an elegant display of a model that will soon be commonplace: Through its automation efforts, Voodoo is showing how even small businesses are beginning to run fully-automated, lights-out operations.

It’s also an illustration of the calculus business owners are now engaging in when deciding whether to invest in personnel or technology. Universal Robots is one of the primary players in the space, with about 60 percent share.

Read more: This robot-run 3D printing farm is the future of light manufacturing | ZDNet

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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This robot-run 3D printing farm is the future of light manufacturing |…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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