Robot bees: Plans for artificial pollinators are afoot | The Economist

IT IS, in one way, the ultimate drone. In another, though, it is the antithesis of what a drone should be. Drones are supposed to laze around in the hive while their sisters collect nectar and pollinate flowers. But pollination is this drone’s very reason for existing.

The drone in question is the brainchild of Eijiro Miyako, of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, in Tsukuba, Japan. It is the first attempt by an engineer to deal with what many perceive as an impending agricultural crisis.

Pollinating insects in general, and bees in particular, are falling in numbers. The reasons why are obscure. But some fear certain crops will become scarcer and more expensive as a result. Attempts to boost the number of natural pollinators have so far failed.

Read more: Robot bees: Plans for artificial pollinators are afoot | The Economist

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Robot bees: Plans for artificial pollinators are afoot | The Economist…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in Drones, News
DARPA drone capture
Watch DARPA’s plan to snatch drones out of the air – The Verge

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, has long had a keen interest in drones. The military’s research wing...

Close