Researchers produce images of people’s faces from their genomes

CRAIG VENTER, boss of Human Longevity, a San Diego-based company that is building the world’s largest genomic database, is a rebel. In the late 1990s he declared that the international, publicly funded project to sequence the human genome was doing in wrong, and developed a cheaper and quicker method of his own. His latest ruffling of feathers comes from work that predicts what a person will look like from their genetic data.

Human Longevity has assembled 45,000 genomes, mostly from patients who have been in clinical trials, and data on their associated physical attributes. The company uses machine-learning tools to analyse these data and then make predictions about how genetic sequences are tied to physical features. These efforts have improved to the point where the company is able to generate photo-like pictures of people without ever clapping eyes on them.

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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Researchers produce images of people’s faces from their genomes

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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