New AI tells masterpieces from forgeries by only looking at brush strokes

AIs might not know much about art, but they can easily tell apart one style from the other — even when they’re terribly similar.

Identifying forgeries is hard, time-consuming, and expensive, but we need it more than ever. The art world is full of forgeries. Recently, a supposed Da Vinci painting sold for $450 million, although suspicions loomed that it might be a fake. The problem is, humans have a hard time telling apart real art from fakes. In most cases, a trained eye will catch small details, identifying tells that confirm or infirm authenticity.

If you want a more thorough confirmation, you might take the art piece in a laboratory for infrared spectroscopy, radiometric dating, gas chromatography, or a combination of such tests. All this takes a lot of time, money, and effort.

Read more: New AI tells masterpieces from forgeries by only looking at brush strokes

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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New AI tells masterpieces from forgeries by only looking at brush stro…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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