Mobileye on the road: Mobileye and Intel join forces | The Economist

CARMAKING in Israel has amounted to some unstylish models in the latter half of the last century and a few rugged off-roaders for the country’s security forces. A reluctance to make them, however, has not stopped Israel from becoming a thriving centre for the high-tech kit with which cars now bristle, and also for services such as ride-hailing.

The latest evidence of Israel’s pre-eminence came on March 13th, when Intel, a giant American chipmaker, paid $15.3bn for Mobileye, a Jerusalem-based firm that is at the forefront of autonomous-car technology. With the acquisition, Intel joins the ranks of technology companies that are trying to outmanoeuvre carmakers and auto-parts suppliers to develop the brains of vehicles of the future.

Mobileye is an attractive target because of what it does now and what it will soon be capable of.

Read more: Mobileye on the road: Mobileye and Intel join forces | The Economist

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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Mobileye on the road: Mobileye and Intel join forces | The Economist

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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