MIT’s new 3D-printed, shock-absorbent materials make for resilient drones | TechCrunch

It’s not the fall, it’s the sudden stop – the effect of an impact has similar negative effects on people and on the sensitive electronic parts of robots. A new research project from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab could help lessen the damaging effects of sudden physical shocks, for both humans and robots alike.

The new technique devised by the MIT CSAIL research team allows a user to program parts made of soft materials, including plastic and rubber, for an exact degree of stiffness and elasticity, giving it a specific quality of bounce and energy transfer depending on the needs of the final product.

This is possible thanks to 3D printing, which allows a user to dictate the exact size, shape and amount of impact damping they provide.

Read more: MIT’s new 3D-printed, shock-absorbent materials make for resilient drones | TechCrunch

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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MIT’s new 3D-printed, shock-absorbent materials make for resilient d…

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