KEYS have been around for a long time. The earliest, made from wood, date back to the ancient Egyptians. The Romans improved them by making them from metal. But there, more or less, they have stayed.

A key is still, basically, a piece of metal sporting a series of grooves, teeth and indentations which, when inserted into a keyway, line up to move pins and levers to lock or unlock a mechanism.

Such keys are made with conventional manufacturing techniques, such as cutting and stamping. But now there is a new way, in the form of 3D printing, to craft metal objects. And keys are about to succumb to it, to the great benefit of keyholders.

A 3D printer successively adds layers of material to the object being created. It can thus make something from the inside out.

Read more: Locksmithing: A 3D-printed key that can’t be copied | The Economist

Don’t forget to share this via , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Published by Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Locksmithing: A 3D-printed key that can’t be copied | The Economist…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in 3D Printing, News
AR to transform next 50 years
Oculus’s Michael Abrash: AR will change everything in ‘the next 50 years’ | VentureBeat

Oculus chief scientist Michael Abrash believes that we may soon see the proliferation of augmented reality glasses, describing them as...

Close