An Improved AlphaGo Wins Its First Game Against the World’s Top Go Player

In the first game of his match with AlphaGo—the Go-playing machine built by Google’s DeepMind—Chinese grandmaster Ke Jie opened with a move straight from the playbook of his AI opponent. But the gambit didn’t work. After four hours and fifteen minutes of play, the 19-year-old grandmaster resigned, and AlphaGo grabbed a 1–0 lead in this best-of-three match.

Last year, AlphaGo topped the Korean grandmaster Lee Sedol, becoming the first machine to beat a professional Go player—a feat that most AI researchers believed was still years away, given the extreme complexity of the game. Now, here in Wuzhen, China, AlphaGo is challenging Ke Jie, the current world number one.

According to Demis Hassabis, the CEO and founder of DeepMind, this time out the machine is driven by a new and more powerful architecture.

Read more: An Improved AlphaGo Wins Its First Game Against the World’s Top Go Player

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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An Improved AlphaGo Wins Its First Game Against the World’s Top Go P…

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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