Google’s AI Wizard Unveils a New Twist on Neural Networks

IF YOU WANT to blame someone for the hoopla around artificial intelligence, 69-year-old Google researcher Geoff Hinton is a good candidate.

The droll University of Toronto professor jolted the field onto a new trajectory in October 2012. With two grad students, Hinton showed that an unfashionable technology he’d championed for decades called artificial neural networks permitted a huge leap in machines’ ability to understand images. Within six months, all three researchers were on Google’s payroll. Today neural networks transcribe our speechrecognize our petsand fight our trolls.

But Hinton now belittles the technology he helped bring to the world. “I think the way we’re doing computer vision is just wrong,” he says. “It works better than anything else at present but that doesn’t mean it’s right.”

Hinton has unveiled another “old” idea that might transform how computers see.

Read more: Google’s AI Wizard Unveils a New Twist on Neural Networks

Don’t forget to share this via , , Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Buffer, , Tumblr, Reddit, StumbleUpon and Delicious.

Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future.

He lives in London with a single android – a temperamental vacuum cleaner – but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Google’s AI Wizard Unveils a New Twist on Neural Networks

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
Hi there - can I help you with anything?
[Subscribe here]
 
More in Machine Learning, News
Cities for driverless cars
How to Design Streets for Humans—and Self-Driving Cars

URBAN PLANNERS TALK about two visions of the future city: heaven and hell. Hell, in case it's not clear, is bad—cities...

Close