Why a dumb bot might be more helpful than a smart bot (for now) | VentureBeat

A low-profile robot glides silently over a magnetic strip on a cement floor, operating unnoticed in an assembly plant. When someone walks in front of it, the robot stops and waits. If you press a button on one end of the plant, you can summon the bot, then connect a few metal carts to make a robot-powered train and instruct the bot to deliver the parts.

This process happens over 180 times per day, seven days a week. Before the bot took over, a human operator pulled the metal carts by hand, over and over again. This is not a wonder of engineering per se, but it is amazingly practical and helpful.I noticed the bots right away, but then again, I’m a major Star Wars fan.

 

Read more: Why a dumb bot might be more helpful than a smart bot (for now) | VentureBeat | Bots | by John Brandon

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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Why a dumb bot might be more helpful than a smart bot (for now) | Vent…

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