What Drones Did for the Sky, Robot Subs Are About to Do for the Sea

The next drone revolution is happening underwater. Just as flying drones have changed from expensive specialist tools to mass-market million-sellers in a few short years, their aquatic counterparts are opening up the seas.

Unmanned submarines, known as Remotely Operated Vehicles, can regularly be seen on television exploring sunken cities or looking for crashed aircraft. They are connected to a mothership via a tether and can dive deeper and longer than a SCUBA diver.

For humans, anything below a hundred feet is a “deep dive” that can require hours of decompression. Not so for bots, which can swim deeper and faster. ROVs can handle conditions that are unsafe for human divers, like swimming in oil, sewage, and extreme cold. They do not get hungry or tired.

Read more: What Drones Did for the Sky, Robot Subs Are About to Do for the Sea

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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What Drones Did for the Sky, Robot Subs Are About to Do for the Sea

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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