In China, a Three-Digit Score Could Dictate Your Place in Society

WHEN Lazarus Liu moved home to China after studying logistics in the UK, he noticed that something had changed: Everyone paid for everything with their phones. At McDonald’s, the convenience store, even at mom-and-pop restaurants, his friends used mobile payments.

Cash, Liu could see, had been largely replaced by two smartphone apps: Alipay and WeChat Pay. One day, at a vegetable market, he watched a woman his mother’s age pull out her phone to pay for her groceries. He decided to sign up.

To get an Alipay ID, Liu had to enter his cell phone number and scan his national ID card. He did so reflexively. Alipay had built a reputation for reliability, and compared to going to a bank managed with slothlike indifference and zero attention to customer service, signing up for Alipay was almost fun.

Read more: In China, a Three-Digit Score Could Dictate Your Place in Society

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Mike Rawson

Mike Rawson has recently re-awoken a long-standing interest in robots and our automated future. He lives in London with a single android - a temperamental vacuum cleaner - but is looking forward to getting more cyborgs soon.

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In China, a Three-Digit Score Could Dictate Your Place in Society

by Mike Rawson time to read: 1 min
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