“Like a giant metal baby”: whether you like it or not, robots are already part of our world

There were no fireworks to dazzle the crowd lining the streets of Alexandria to celebrate Cleopatra’s triumphant return to the city in 47BC. Rather, there was a four-and-a-half-metre-tall robotic effigy of the queen, which squirted milk from mechanical bosoms on to the heads of onlookers. Cleopatra, so the figure was meant to symbolise, was a mother to her people.

Science Museum’s Robots: Who is really pulling the strings? | New Scientist

RoboThespian welcomes visitors to the opening of Robots at London’s Science Museum with suitable drama. The life-sized humanoid blinks its pixelated eyes, moves its head and gestures theatrically as it introduces the exhibition with great enthusiasm.

Science Museum’s robotic delights hold a mirror to human society | Guardian

Eric the robot wowed the crowds. He stood and bowed and answered questions as blue sparks shot from his metallic teeth. The British creation was such a hit he went on tour around the world. When he arrived in New York, in 1929, a theatre nightwatchman was so alarmed he pulled out a gun and shot at him.

The 1950s Toy Robot Sensation That Time Forgot | Fast Company

In examining the history of famous robots, you’d be forgiven for overlooking a 1950s children’s toy named Robert.

Robert the Robot, who was a product of the once-mighty Ideal Toy Company, didn’t do much, at least compared to the standards set by science fiction at the time. Unlike the helpful humanoids of Isaac Asimov’s I, Robot, Robert was just a 14-inch-tall hunk of plastic that could utter a few phrases, wheel around with a tethered remote control, and grip objects in his mechanical arms.

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