Robotics, AI​​ and 3D printing could close UK’s productivity gap | The Guardian

The future has already arrived in a small factory in Worcester, according to the man hired by Theresa May to put Britain at the forefront of the next industrial revolution.

Juergen Maier, the chief executive of Siemens UK, believes new technologies including robotics, artificial intelligence and additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, can deliver greater productivity and create more highly paid jobs.

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Locksmithing: A 3D-printed key that can’t be copied | The Economist

KEYS have been around for a long time. The earliest, made from wood, date back to the ancient Egyptians. The Romans improved them by making them from metal. But there, more or less, they have stayed.

A key is still, basically, a piece of metal sporting a series of grooves, teeth and indentations which, when inserted into a keyway, line up to move pins and levers to lock or unlock a mechanism.

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3D printing gains traction in industrial tool kits

Just a fraction of a second can make the difference in Formula One. Over the course of a season, these smallest of margins can separate the winner of the motorsport championship from the also-rans.

One of the ways UK-based McLaren-Honda is looking to capture those marginal gains is with the use of a portable 3D printer, which it took to a Grand Prix event for the first time this month in Bahrain.

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3D-printed bacteria could make bespoke graphene-like materials | New Scientist

How do you make a bespoke material with graphene-like properties? By putting bacteria to work using a 3D printer. Such bacteria could create brand new materials. For example, if you could use bacteria to print a substance resembling graphene – the 2D material made of single-atom layers of carbon – the end product might have similar desirable properties.

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