High in the sky: Small flying “cars” come a bit closer to reality | The Economist

YOU may smile, but it will come,” said Henry Ford in 1940, predicting the arrival of a machine that was part-automobile and part-aeroplane. For decades flying cars have obsessed technologists but eluded their mastery. Finally there is reason to believe. Several firms have offered hope that flying people in small pods for short trips might become a reality in the next decade.

Machine Learning AI Algorithms Predict Heart Attacks Better Than Doctors | HotHardware

We have been talking about benefits of machine-learning investments for quite some time. There’s simply an incredible amount of potential and opportunities that can come from these learning machines – especially where the medical field is concerned. IBM’s Watson might have been one of the first major computers to be used in this way, but the number of dedicated learning machines out there continues to grow by the day.

McKinsey: AI, jobs, and workforce automation | ZDNet

For business people, AI presents a variety of challenges. On a technology level, artificial intelligence and machine learning is complicated to develop and demands rich data sets to produce meaningful results. From a business perspective, many business leaders have difficulty figuring out where to apply AI and even how to start the machine intelligence journey.

Your Home’s Next Must-Have Accessory Is a Fancy Router | WIRED

You probably don’t give your router any thought once you’ve shoved that spidery doodad with all the antennae under your TV, in a cabinet, or behind the shoes in your closet. You buy it, install it, and forget about it until something goes wrong.

This solar-powered device can squeeze water out of thin air

You can’t squeeze blood from a stone, but you can squeeze water from thin air — even in the driest areas of the world.

The new water harvester is made of metal organic framework crystals pressed into a thin sheet of copper metal and placed between a solar absorber (above) and a condenser plate (below).

Locksmithing: A 3D-printed key that can’t be copied | The Economist

KEYS have been around for a long time. The earliest, made from wood, date back to the ancient Egyptians. The Romans improved them by making them from metal. But there, more or less, they have stayed.

A key is still, basically, a piece of metal sporting a series of grooves, teeth and indentations which, when inserted into a keyway, line up to move pins and levers to lock or unlock a mechanism.

Oculus’s Michael Abrash: AR will change everything in ‘the next 50 years’ | VentureBeat

Oculus chief scientist Michael Abrash believes that we may soon see the proliferation of augmented reality glasses, describing them as possibly “one of the great transformational technologies of the next 50 years.” But he believes AR glasses must be see-through, stylish, and socially acceptable, among other things.

3D printing gains traction in industrial tool kits

Just a fraction of a second can make the difference in Formula One. Over the course of a season, these smallest of margins can separate the winner of the motorsport championship from the also-rans.

One of the ways UK-based McLaren-Honda is looking to capture those marginal gains is with the use of a portable 3D printer, which it took to a Grand Prix event for the first time this month in Bahrain.

Cloning voices: Imitating people’s speech patterns precisely could bring trouble | The Economist

UTTER 160 or so French or English phrases into a phone app developed by CandyVoice, a new Parisian company, and the app’s software will reassemble tiny slices of those sounds to enunciate, in a plausible simulacrum of your own dulcet tones.

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